Vincent Shoes Spring Line 2007

The Spring/Summer collection from Vincent Shoes is here. I’m on record being quite pleased with these Swedish imports. Solid craftsmanship, stylish, and sometimes excruciatingly cute.

Photo of my daughter's feet wearing the Stan shoes.

Stan sneakers by Vincent Shoes have Velcro wings and an exterior non-squishing tongue for easy on and off.

What’s in a spring and summer collection? Open-toe shoes, dress shoes for Easter, sandals and canvas shoes. There are some entirely new designs, such as the open-toed Vidar sandal and the Bobby, a closed-toed sandal.

But when offered a sample for review, I had to go with something a little more bread and butter. (That’s my way of saying, I bit my lip and opted for sneakers instead of terribly cute sandals, though sneakers are cute in their own way, but sandals are more like an archetype of childhood.)

The Stan model is a sneaker for tongue-tied kids. It has the requisite running stripes and the Vincent “V” logo on the shoe’s tongue. The tongue makes this shoe special because it is a T-shaped flap located on the exterior of the shoe. The flap adheres with Velcro. Pull it up, insert foot, push it down. My 2.8-year-old daughter handles the shoe with ease, unlike shoes with a traditional tongues that get squished down when she inserts her foot. It’s really a great design feature for a toddler shoe.

Our other spring model is the Herman sneaker. Vincent calls it “rugged” and “sporty,” for all-day hiking and such. For me, the selling point is its being a traditional sneaker in terms of how we think of adult shoes, but with bungee laces and a Velcro fastener. If you’re not familiar with bungee laces, think of them as holding the shoe tightly to your child’s foot, but with elasticity so that you can easily get a foot in and out. We’ve been playing a bit of indoor soccer and these are just the shoes to head out to a park with for some ball practice. Falling is so much nicer on grass than on a hard floor. She’s also wearing her Hermans this week as Mom and daughter visit friends in Reno.

My advice with traditional sneakers is to buy a size larger than your child’s current size because sneakers tend to be more snug than, say, a sandal. It’s hard to go wrong because if the shoe is still a little large, your kid will soon grow into it. Don’t miss Vincent’s shoe-fitter guide.

One thing I was mildly concerned about with my shoe selections was gender perception. Many of the Vincent models have male and female names, and some are noticeably feminine (say, the flowerly Mini Betty shoes). But I realized Stan and Herman weren’t any different than our other shoe choices. Athletic and sporty are ideas that fit girls too. If anything, it’s the parents of boys who have it tough because they are less likely to cross the gender barrier. My daughter does wear a pair of very cute and girly Love sandals. That’s OK for when she wants to be cute, but I’m hoping to see her running around in sneakers this summer.

Multiple shoe photos and a couple Stan tongue-twisting photos can be found after the jump.

Photo of my daughter pulling the Velco tongue to take off her Stan shoe.
Photo of my daughter pulling the Velco tongue to take off her Stan shoe.
Photo of a Stan shoe by Vincent Shoes.
Photo of a Stan shoe by Vincent Shoes.
Photo of a Stan shoe by Vincent Shoes.
Photo of a Stan shoe by Vincent Shoes.
Photo of a Herman shoe by Vincent Shoes.
Photo of a Herman shoe by Vincent Shoes.
Photo of a Herman shoe by Vincent Shoes.
Photo of a Herman shoe by Vincent Shoes.

Comments

2 Responses to “Vincent Shoes Spring Line 2007”

  1. Mark says:

    Do you notice (or maybe more remember back, since my son is younger than your daughter) if there were issues with randomly pulling shoes off with velcro rather than laces? We are constantly retying shoes which can get old in a hurry, but he is facinated with pulling stuff open so I’m afraid he’d be absolutely fixated on pulling open velcro straps to get the shoes off.

    March 20th, 2007 at 12:06 pm

  2. AJ says:

    If your son is sophisticated enough to remove laced shoes, don’t think of Velcro as being easier to remove. He has already mastered the toughest shoes you can give him. So, look at Velcro as being easier to put on, for both you and him. Maybe when he has to put on his own shoes he won’t be so keen on prematurely removing them.

    March 20th, 2007 at 12:22 pm

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